spookychan

things-u-people-wouldnt-believe:

Rachael’s Black Dress.

Black silk and snake skin two-piece couture suit designed by Charles Knode, comprising a waisted hip-length jacket with padding to shoulders, collars and cuffs trimmed with black snake skin, additional snake skin relief to breast and five button closure together with corresponding knee length skirt.

This costume was worn by Sean Young during the Tyrell’s Building sequence (introduction of the character and the Voight-Kampft test).

It was also worn by the actress during the London premiere and promotion of the film in 1982. The style of this dress was the inspiration for the “power dressing” fashion trend for business women in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

The full costume was originally sold in auction in 2001 for £ 950 and belongs now to a British private collector.

boyhood

boyhood:

An example and detail of beetlewing embroidery made in the 1880s in the Hobart School for Mussulman Girls in Madras, India. The design is stitched in gold thread on black muslin net. The wing cases are from Jewel Beetles which shed them naturally throughout their lives. Clothing and accessories containing beetlewing embroidery became extremely fashionable during the Victorian period.

witchesandslippersandhoods

witchesandslippersandhoods:

Wedding gown designed by Eiko Ishioka for Bram Stoker’s Dracula

'It's a somewhat strange concept, but I loved the look of the Australian collared lizard and felt that it was a fitting image for a woman who had become a vampire. I had never once thought of designing a traditional wedding dress anyway, and when the lizard idea came to me I fashioned a cape, made completely of embroidered lace, based on this idea. Lucy's dress, loaded with embroidery, was created from a stiff net base upon which the dressmakers embroidered my design - all by hand, of course.'

- Eiko On Stage

devi13
Modeling Alienation
The temporal relays of modernity were played out in Alexander McQueen’s Spring–Summer 1999 collection that explored the relationship between the 19th century Arts and Crafts movement and what he called ‘the hard edge of technology of textiles’. Segueing between pre-industrial craft imagery and post-industrial urban alienation, the collection combined moulded leather body corsets with frothy white lace, punched wooden fan skirts and Regency striped silk.
The show was opened by the athlete and model Aimee Mullins in a pair of hand-carved prosthetic legs designed by McQueen (the model was born without shin bones and had her legs amputated below the knee at age of one), and closed by Shalom Harlow who revolved like a music-box doll on a turntable as her white dress was sprayed acid green and black by two menacing industrial paint sprayers which suddenly came to life on the catwalk. 
Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Modeling Alienation

The temporal relays of modernity were played out in Alexander McQueen’s Spring–Summer 1999 collection that explored the relationship between the 19th century Arts and Crafts movement and what he called ‘the hard edge of technology of textiles’. Segueing between pre-industrial craft imagery and post-industrial urban alienation, the collection combined moulded leather body corsets with frothy white lace, punched wooden fan skirts and Regency striped silk.

The show was opened by the athlete and model Aimee Mullins in a pair of hand-carved prosthetic legs designed by McQueen (the model was born without shin bones and had her legs amputated below the knee at age of one), and closed by Shalom Harlow who revolved like a music-box doll on a turntable as her white dress was sprayed acid green and black by two menacing industrial paint sprayers which suddenly came to life on the catwalk. 

Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press